New Advising Videos!

We’re pleased to unveil new advising videos for the Colin Powell School in the following majors: Anthropology, Economics and Business, International Studies, Political Science, and Psychology. These videos will soon be available to view directly from department websites, but are available now on our Vimeo site.

Police Violence & Social Justice: A Faculty-Supported Student Dialogue

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Dear Students,

Members of the faculty have grown concerned about how you are thinking about and coping with issues of police brutality, the response of our justice system, and the protests that have occupied so much of our attention and emotional energy these past few weeks. We’ve noticed many of you with deep concerns and questions. We also know that many of you have felt compelled to join your voice with others in protest.

We’d like to respond. Starting next Monday, December 15, we will be holding a series of meetings in the social science conference room (NAC 6/141) to discuss these issues.

We’re not calling the meetings talks or teach-ins, because we don’t imagine that we’d be in any way instructing you. Rather, think of participating faculty members as resource people: we’ll convene a conversation, be on hand to share whatever we know and answer questions, but mainly make some space for students to talk through some of these issues, and to meet others, like yourselves, who are concerned, have questions, or want to talk. We’ll post a roster of participating faculty, and the experience and expertise that they bring to the table—from knowledge of critical race theory, to legal expertise, to an understanding of the political context. And you will hopefully attend the meeting or meetings that best to fit your schedule or address your concerns.

Sincerely,

Vince Boudreau

Dean, Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership, CCNY

Scheduled Sessions

(as of 12/15/14: check back for updates as we’ll be adding sessions in the coming days)

Monday December 15: 

11:00 AM Leslie Paik, Sociology (Race, Justice, and the Law)

2:00 PM Cheryl Sterling, Director of the Black Studies Department (Critical Race Theory)

Tuesday December 16:

10 AM-12 PM Michael Busch, Associate Director, Office of Student Success

2:00 PM Stan Thangaraj, Anthropology (Cross-racial Possibilities for Solidarity Work Post-Ferguson)

Wednesday December 17

3:00 PM Jennifer Lutton, Honors Center (Race and Racism)

Thursday, December 18

11:00 AM Lotti Silber, Anthropology (Human Rights and Justice)

The Public University: Dying a Slow Death?

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by Vince Boudreau, Dean, Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership, The City College of New York

Year after year, the defunding of public higher education has crept forward without sounding many alarms. It’s not clear that any policy maker or government unit made a specific decision to withdraw support for state universities. Yet, if the current trend continues, most states will have fully divested themselves from supporting public higher education by the 2050s. In New York State, the sunset year is projected to be 2038.

There was a time when New York State citizens covered more than 75 percent of The City College of New York’s budget. Today, that number stands at 36 percent, down a full 11 percentage points in the last four years alone.

How have we allowed this to happen? Through varying degrees of neglect—some more easily pinpointed than others. Continue reading

From our Diplomat-in-Residence: International Education Week, November 17-21

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by Ana Escrogima, New York Metro Diplomat-in-Residence

Greetings from your State Department Diplomat-in-Residence for the New York Metro area! Since I began in September, I’ve had the pleasure of meeting students, faculty, and administrative teams from schools across New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Connecticut. I have seen firsthand just how strong an interest there is in international study and work opportunities as students seek to travel the world, strengthen core skills, and gain insight into future career options.

Today marks the beginning of International Education Week (IEW). Coordinated by the U.S. Department of State and the Department of Education, IEW highlights the importance of international education for American students and the opportunities available to international students pursuing education in the United States. This year the United States is celebrating the 15th anniversary of International Education Week (IEW), and our theme is “International Education is for Everyone.” If you explore the latest Open Doors report, released November 17, you can get a sense of just how widespread study abroad has become in the United States.

I look forward to engaging with students at international education events occurring in the New York area this week and sharing my own experiences as a studying abroad in Paris from 1999-2000. As a New York City native and the daughter of immigrants to the United States, I found myself drawn to explore national identity and citizenship issues while in France through interviews with first-generation immigrants from North African countries. The connections I made to their experiences formed the basis of my senior thesis and graduate school research, and affected my choice to study Arabic and serve the Middle East as a Foreign Service Officer.

My experience and that of many others show that people with an international education bridge socio-economic, cultural, political, religious, and geographic differences and promote greater understanding of one another’s values and views. We need students from diverse backgrounds from locations around the world and with an assortment of academic interests.

The State Department directly supports exchange programs that make international educational experiences accessible for people representing the full diversity of communities. Increasing the number and diversity of students who benefit from these experiences is integral to building and sustaining a more democratic, secure, and prosperous world. International students enrich classrooms, campuses and communities in ways that endure long after students return home. This cooperation is essential to solving global challenges like climate change, violent extremism, as well as health and food security.

Below are some of the resources at your fingertips to learn more. I hope to see City College students at the November 18 panel on international education and careers hosted by the Undergraduate Student Government, and I encourage you to be in touch at dirnewyorkmetro@state.gov.

Links for further research:

IEW website

State Department Exchanges Website:

State Department Careers Website

The Roosevelt Institute Campus Network at CCNY

The Roosevelt Institute at CCNY has produced a lovely video highlighting the ways the student club takes action and makes change. Check it out!

Three Crucial Questions for Every Student

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by Kamilah Briscoe, Director, Office of Student Success

In its name and mission, the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership pledges to “enable our students to energetically address the challenges of the 21st century” by “promoting the values of service, engagement, and leadership.” We believe a fundamental lesson of leadership is the idea of agency. The Office of Student Success begins teaching this lesson by asking our students three questions.

Continue reading

Thoughts from an IS Alumna and Former SAIS President-Veronica Agard

Colin Powell School:

Veronica Agard gives some advice to new students and shows some love for the International Studies program!

Originally posted on Global City:

What can I say about the IS Family and SAIS that hasn’t already been said?

Community. At a commuter school situated in the heart of Harlem, NYC : it was very easy for me to be another face in the crowd. Now when you compounded that with the fact that I was a transfer student, I essentially became an island on an island. Sure, I had roommates at the Towers, some of whom I’m still close with and grateful to say so. There were always those fast friends made in classes, but once the semester ended, that was pretty much It (with some exceptions).

Having been fortunate enough to have traveled during my middle school and high school years, (Spain, France and Italy/South Africa/Russia) I knew very early on that a path in the “international” scene was the only way for me to go. Of course, like many people, I…

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