Have you seen A New Light in Harlem?

Do you know a young person who wants to be a leader in public service? Get access to world-class preparatory coursework and field experience without amassing piles of debt? Are you a scholar, educator, or community organizer looking to break down walls between the Academy and the surrounding community? Who knows that in order to find better answers to pressing questions of the 21st century, we need to hear more voices? Watch and learn more about the mission of the Colin Powell School—”A New Light in Harlem.”

Our original upload to YouTube got over 600 views in just a matter of days! We had to do a *tiny* bit of clean-up, so we uploaded a new version (click below).

The film features interviews with General Colin Powell, Dean Vince Boudreau, and faculty, students, alumni, and board members, spotlighting the amazing community we have up here on the City College campus.

Do you know a young person who wants to be a leader in public service? Get access to world-class preparatory coursework and field experience without amassing piles of debt?

Are you a scholar, educator, or community organizer looking to break down walls between the Academy and the surrounding community? Who knows that in order to find better answers to pressing questions of the 21st century, we need to hear more voices?

Watch and learn more about the mission of the Colin Powell School—”A New Light in Harlem.”

 

Join Engineers Without Borders at CCNY

Now we are ready to embark on a new project in Eyek, Cameroon. The project is a partnership with deserving community of a population of about 1000 people in Eyek to build a very much-needed community center. This community center will house a potable water system, market stalls for farmers to sell their produce, and also a small medical dispensary. The center will also be a place for young people to learn trade skills, while providing EWB students skill-building opportunities in several engineering disciplines, including civil, mechanical, environmental, and electrical.

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An EWB-CCNY student working in the field.

by Zineb Bouizy, Secretary, Engineers Without Borders-CCNY Chapter

I come from a poor family in Morocco. When I came to the US six years ago, I came alone and did not know any English. I started working full-time to support myself and help my family back in Morocco, and began to pursue my dream of becoming a civil engineer. It was my experience struggling to get the basic necessities in my hometown that led me to engineering as a professional path, and fortunately, I made my way into the Grove School of Engineering at City College. My personal experience is also what drove me to become involved with Engineers Without Borders (EWB), a humanitarian organization that supports the design and implementation of community-driven, sustainable engineering projects worldwide. Continue reading “Join Engineers Without Borders at CCNY”

Center Alumnus Ethan Frisch: Working for Change in Afghanistan

Colin Powell Leadership Alumnus Ethan Frisch (2006–2008) is now working in Afghanistan with the Aga Khan Foundation, a humanitarian organization. We recently followed-up with Ethan to learn more about his work, goals, and trajectory.

efrisch_crop_vhColin Powell Leadership Alumnus Ethan Frisch (2006–2008) is now working in Afghanistan with the Aga Khan Foundation, a humanitarian organization. We recently followed up with Ethan to learn more about his work, goals, and trajectory.

What are you doing in Afghanistan?
I’m working for the Aga Khan Foundation–Afghanistan as the national program coordinator for engineering, helping to oversee the administration of grants dealing with physical infrastructure and engineering projects in northern Afghanistan. I’m based at AKF’s headquarters in Kabul, working closely with our regional teams and traveling regularly throughout the five provinces in which AKF works. Continue reading “Center Alumnus Ethan Frisch: Working for Change in Afghanistan”

Center Coordinator Hosts an Open Discussion on Dissenting Diplomats

Program Coordinator Michael Busch is hosting an open discussion with Hannah Gurman on opposition of US diplomats to American foreign policy.

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Hannah Gurman’s The Dissent Papers. Image: Amazon.com.

On Sunday, July 8, I’ll be hosting the FireDogLake Book Salon with New York University’s Hannah Gurman at 2:00pm. We’ll be discussing her recent book, The Dissent Papers: The Voices of Diplomats in the Cold War and BeyondAs FDL notes,

Beginning with the Cold War and concluding with the 2003 invasion of Iraq, Hannah Gurman explores the overlooked opposition of U.S. diplomats to American foreign policy in the latter half of the twentieth century. During America’s reign as a dominant world power, U.S. presidents and senior foreign policy officials largely ignored or rejected their diplomats’ reports, memos, and telegrams, especially when they challenged key policies relating to the Cold War, China, and the wars in Vietnam and Iraq. The Dissent Papers recovers these diplomats’ invaluable perspective and their commitment to the transformative power of diplomatic writing. Continue reading “Center Coordinator Hosts an Open Discussion on Dissenting Diplomats”

Judging History’s Boogeymen: What Justice Is There for Genocide?

What justice can the legal system provide in sending old men to prison for crimes against humanity?

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Comrade Duch at his trial. Photo: Wikimedia Commons.

Last month, I saw “Brother Number One,” a documentary by Annie Goldson that follows New Zealander Rob Hamill on the trail of his brother Kerry, who was captured and killed by the Cambodian Khmer Rouge regime in 1978. Kerry was just one of 1.5 million victims of the regime, nearly all of them Cambodians.

In the film, Rob travels to Cambodia to testify at the trial for crimes against humanity of Kang Kek Iew, better known as Comrade Duch, the director of the infamous S-21 prison where Kerry and thousands of others were tortured and killed. (Duch was sentenced to 35 years in prison in 2010, extended to a life sentence this year.)

Who Does Justice Benefit?

Throughout the film, I thought back to my college history thesis, on the 1994 trial of Paul Touvier for crimes against humanity. Touvier was the first Frenchman to be tried on that charge, and his trial, a half century after the German occupation of France ended, brought the dark memories of collaboration and the dirty deeds of the Vichy regime to the surface of the public consciousness. Continue reading “Judging History’s Boogeymen: What Justice Is There for Genocide?”

World’s Largest Refugee Camp Turns 20-Years-Old. That’s a Major Problem.

Located in Eastern Kenya, Dadaab is the largest refugee camp in the world with almost half a million refugees. 500,000 people in temporary housing, with no water, electricity, or income.

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A school at the Dadaab refugee camp, in Kenya. Photo: Public Domain

This post originally appeared on DevelopKenya.com.

Depressing right? Located in Eastern Kenya, Dadaab is the largest refugee camp in the world with almost half a million refugees living there. That’s 500,000 people. Living in temporary housing – mostly tents, but also mud and brick houses. With no water, electricity, means of income..nothing.

There are 10,000 third-generation refugees in Dadaab. What the hell?? That means their parents were born in the camp as well. It was set up 20 years ago with 90,000 Somali refugees fleeing the Somali civil war of 1991/1992. Continue reading “World’s Largest Refugee Camp Turns 20-Years-Old. That’s a Major Problem.”

Moving Beyond the Mafia State

If international relations (IR) scholarship is to advance policymakers’ understanding of transnational organized crime and its role with respect to state power — and therefore by extension, the best ways to militate against illicit power corrupting the national interests of states — new theoretical frameworks are needed.

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Moisés Naím at the 2009 World Economic Forum on Latin America. Photo: World Economic Forum / Creative Commons

Originally posted on Huffington Post by Center Coordinator Michael Busch.

Earlier this spring, Moisés Naím provocatively warned against an emerging menace facing our world today — the advent of what he terms the “mafia state.” Analyzing the role of transnational organized crime in the age of globalization has been Naím’s bailiwick for some years now, and familiar readers will find little that catches them off-guard. Still, his argument that illicit actors have penetrated national governments with unprecedented success in recent years should be enough for policymakers to take notice. Naím doesn’t mince words about what’s at stake. “In a mafia state, high government officials actually become integral players in, if not the leaders of, criminal enterprises, and the defense and promotion of those enterprises’ businesses become official priorities.” Continue reading “Moving Beyond the Mafia State”

Linking Studies with Service, a Center Fellow Launches a Career in Global Public Health

A former Colin Powell fellow, Mohamed Jallow has begun a career in global public health, with positions as the Council on Foreign Relations and IntraHealth International.

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Former fellow Mohamed Jallow (right) with Ambassador John Price. Photo: Sirin Samman

Looking back at my academic and career trajectory, it would not have been possible without my affiliation with the Colin Powell Center. My internship at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), which led to my full time employment there after graduation, was largely due to the service-learning requirements at the Colin Powell Center. The idea of linking students with a domestic or international organization engaged in work around a student’s area of interest to provide real world experience is innovative and immensely rewarding to those who participate. My time at the CFR allowed me not only to grow my professional network, but to learn and discover new approaches to solving global issues, including global public health, a field in which I currently work. Continue reading “Linking Studies with Service, a Center Fellow Launches a Career in Global Public Health”