Have you seen A New Light in Harlem?

Do you know a young person who wants to be a leader in public service? Get access to world-class preparatory coursework and field experience without amassing piles of debt? Are you a scholar, educator, or community organizer looking to break down walls between the Academy and the surrounding community? Who knows that in order to find better answers to pressing questions of the 21st century, we need to hear more voices? Watch and learn more about the mission of the Colin Powell School—”A New Light in Harlem.”

Our original upload to YouTube got over 600 views in just a matter of days! We had to do a *tiny* bit of clean-up, so we uploaded a new version (click below).

The film features interviews with General Colin Powell, Dean Vince Boudreau, and faculty, students, alumni, and board members, spotlighting the amazing community we have up here on the City College campus.

Do you know a young person who wants to be a leader in public service? Get access to world-class preparatory coursework and field experience without amassing piles of debt?

Are you a scholar, educator, or community organizer looking to break down walls between the Academy and the surrounding community? Who knows that in order to find better answers to pressing questions of the 21st century, we need to hear more voices?

Watch and learn more about the mission of the Colin Powell School—”A New Light in Harlem.”

 

Student Spotlight: Fatjon Kaja

Fatjon Kaja is, by all counts, an exceptional student here at the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership. Furthermore, his good humor, sensitivity, and commitment to service for the public good have made him a trusted peer among the school’s students and fellows. In this interview with Neighborhoods and Nations, we ask Kaja to describe his path from rural Albania to Harlem. Along the way, Kaja offers insight into why he believes Colin Powell School students have an edge as they pursue civic and global leadership roles after completing their studies at The City College of New York.

Fatjon Kaja
Fatjon Kaja

Fatjon Kaja is, by all counts, an exceptional student here at the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership. Furthermore, his good humor, sensitivity, and commitment to service for the public good have made him a trusted peer among the school’s students and fellows.

Kaja, a recent immigrant to the U.S. from Albania, is enrolled in the B.A./M.A. program in Economics and has a second major in Pre-Law, with minors in Italian and French. He is a Legal Scholar in the Skadden, Arps Honors Program in Legal Studies, the Co-founder and Vice-Director of the Guidance for the Legal Empowerment of Youth (now the ACLU Chapter at the City College of New York), and Deputy Policy Director of the Economic Development Policy Sector of the Roosevelt Institute at the City College of New York. He was a Partners for Change Fellow in 2013-2014 and has held numerous leadership roles in other campus offices and activities, including student government.

In his free time, he likes to explore New York City, listens to classical music, and plays soccer with his friends and relatives. In this interview with Neighborhoods and Nations, we ask Kaja to describe his path from rural Albania to Harlem. Along the way, Kaja offers insight into why he believes Colin Powell School students have an edge as they pursue civic and global leadership roles after completing their studies at The City College of New York. Continue reading “Student Spotlight: Fatjon Kaja”

The Roosevelt Institute Campus Network at CCNY

The Roosevelt Institute at CCNY has produced a lovely video highlighting the ways the student club takes action and makes change. Check it out!

The Roosevelt Institute at CCNY has produced a lovely video highlighting the ways the student club takes action and makes change. Check it out!

Three Crucial Questions for Every Student

In its name and mission, the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership pledges to “enable our students to energetically address the challenges of the 21st century” by “promoting the values of service, engagement, and leadership.” We believe a fundamental lesson of leadership is the idea of agency. The Office of Student Success begins teaching this lesson by asking our students three questions.

Kamilah Briscoe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

by Kamilah Briscoe, Director, Office of Student Success

In its name and mission, the Colin Powell School for Civic and Global Leadership pledges to “enable our students to energetically address the challenges of the 21st century” by “promoting the values of service, engagement, and leadership.” We believe a fundamental lesson of leadership is the idea of agency. The Office of Student Success begins teaching this lesson by asking our students three questions.

Continue reading “Three Crucial Questions for Every Student”

Building a Future in ‘Green Building’

I study at the Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture at CCNY. Architecture, in my mind, is an art form that influences everyone—whether they are aware of it or not. Growing up in Pakistan, environmental challenges made me especially aware of the impact structural design has on people and their everyday experiences.

The Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture at CCNY
The Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture at CCNY

by Mayra Mahmood, architectural student and Colin Powell School ‘Partners for Change’ fellow

I study at the Bernard and Anne Spitzer School of Architecture at CCNY. Architecture, in my mind, is an art form that influences everyone—whether they are aware of it or not. Growing up in Pakistan, environmental challenges made me especially aware of the impact structural design has on people and their everyday experiences.

But I didn’t start out pursuing a career as an architect. I was on my way to medical school, believing I was destined to be a doctor like all the other Pakistani girls (and some boys) I knew. In the summer following a year of pre-med studies, I interned at the Education Health and Development Foundation (EHD), a non-profit organization. At the edge of Islamabad, there were slums in which mostly Afghan refugees lived. The EHD had built some temporary schools there and needed volunteer teachers: I was the English teacher. Everyday, a child from the school would come to grab me from the main highway and take me through the narrow mud streets to the school. The refugees lived in mud houses with no electricity or proper drainage systems. I began to notice little inventions they designed for this environment to make do. For example, they made a cow fence out of bicycle wheels and whatever else they could find.

I was both fascinated and deeply affected by my observations. I realized then that I didn’t want to help people by becoming a doctor; I wanted to help people by becoming an architect.

Continue reading “Building a Future in ‘Green Building’”

‘Let’s Get Ready’: Not Your Ordinary Work-Study

let's get ready group shot

by Angela Choi, Community Engagement Fellow at the Colin Powell School

When you scan the list of available federal work-study jobs, many are in campus offices or departments needing administrative help. But there’s another opportunity, one that takes you away from paperwork and into the City College community.

Let’s Get Ready is a nonprofit organization that provides free SAT preparation to students from families with low incomes, and assists these students throughout the college application process. Let’s Get Ready at City College is a different kind of on-campus work-study, where students awarded federal work-study funding get paid to do great work. It’s a unique opportunity to engage and have an impact on your community.

While I was still in high school, I had a burning desire to go to college—but I didn’t know how to get there. My parents had not gone to college in this country and were unfamiliar with the application process. My parents believed it was my high school’s responsibility to help me get into college, and expected their support. Unfortunately, this just wasn’t the case. Continue reading “‘Let’s Get Ready’: Not Your Ordinary Work-Study”

Speak Up and Speak Out Against Domestic Violence

At Speak Up Speak Out we want to empower students to take a stand against violence, and we believe that starts by educating ourselves about abusive relationships. We believe that domestic violence is prevalent in our society, that it exists across race, class, and gender lines, that it exists on our campus, and that we have both the opportunity and the responsibility to put an end to intimate partner violence.

by Gargi Padki, Community Engagement Fellow, Colin Powell School

Project Speak Up Speak Out will release a photo project that has been in development since early October on December 2nd at 12:30pm in the North Academic Center rotunda.

During our “16 Days Against Gender Violence,” we will display photos taken of over a hundred students, faculty, and staff at City College in order to start a dialogue about domestic violence awareness on our campus. Speak Up Speak Out is committed to breaking the silence of domestic violence and addressing violence in our communities as a public health issue. In the spring, we will begin recruiting volunteers to help in our continued efforts to engage the college community to speak out against domestic violence. Continue reading “Speak Up and Speak Out Against Domestic Violence”

Reflections Through the Lens

We were six days into our journey through Southwestern Oklahoma, on a mission to gather footage for a multi-chapter documentary series called “Being Indian in Oklahoma,” directed by Prof. Campbell Dalglish of the Film and Video Production program at The City College of New York, targeted for the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian. I signed on to the project as an intern through the Colin Powell Center at City College, and was tasked with being the 2nd Camera Operator under Niav Conty, Director of Photography and CCNY MFA Media Production Alum.

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By Raymond Guarnieri, Colin Powell Fellow

The rain had stopped early in the evening, leaving everything glistening as the sun began to sink behind the clouds. It was a beautiful June weekend in the town of Clinton, Oklahoma. I stood in a red mud puddle outside of one of the local Cheyenne-Arapaho community centers. Inside, Indians of different tribes danced to the steady heartbeat of the drums and made offerings to those who were sick or in need, or simply to their fellow community members, out of love and respect. Camera in hand, crouched and propped against an air-conditioning unit, I focused my lens on a group of children as they played “follow the leader” and climbed onto a storage unit next to an elementary school—a classic image of the carefree days of childhood. Continue reading “Reflections Through the Lens”